Educational

What does an Accessible Canada mean to you?

“We have made considerable progress in making our society more inclusive, but there is still work to do. Canadians with disabilities continue to face barriers in their daily lives. What does an accessible Canada mean to you? Please take the time to participate in our online consultation or to attend one of our public sessions in person. Together, we will make history.”
   – The Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities

Approximately 14% of Canadians aged 15 years or older reported having a disability that limited them in their daily activities. There are approximately 411,600 working-aged Canadians with disabilities who are not working but whose disability does not prevent them from doing so; almost half of these potential workers are post-secondary graduates.

What are the main barriers to accessibility that Canadians with disabilities face?

What would it take to fix those barriers?

How can we change attitudes in Canada to better include and respect people with disabilities?


The title “Pareil pas pareil” refers to people who have an intellectual disability, who are like others in many ways and also not like others. It is the title of a new, ground-breaking and highly accessible 14-minute video.
A free educational resource supporting topics related to diversity, equity, inclusion, tolerance, respect, and social responsibility – for senior elementary and secondary students
A free tool to help build inclusion, understanding and community in your classroom or school. Recommended for intermediate and senior secondary Health, Career Education, Leadership and Social Studies.
Recommended by Curriculum Services Canada for Grades 7-12, to support curriculum topics relating to inclusion, identity, community, human relationships, and goal setting.
Honouring the contributions of people with developmental disabilities